Silence
Silence gives consent.

Ralph Profitt | April 15, 2018

I've sometimes heard well meaning folks kindly suggest that to insure the most friendly, amiable, and cordial relationships possible when inter-reacting with others -- is to try very hard to always avoid speaking about politics or religion, and to tread very lightly around others talking about such subjects.

In spite of such careful precautions, and with great reluctance, I respectfully disagree and have often felt that perhaps that's why both topics are so greatly distorted and misunderstood.

Human interest in the realms of spirituality and personal freedoms sought through governments of the people, by the people, and for the people have long historical legacies of immense importance.

Unfortunately, our America is currently so politically charged

Unfortunately, our America is currently so politically charged with emotional platitudes, ridicule, and volatile temperaments at the moment -- with ever increasing degrees of intolerance, it seems as if anyone who is not actively engaged in considering one side or the other of these particular topics, can sometimes arouse suspicions about anyone choosing to be wary of such potential conflicts, and deciding instead to remain quietly on the sidelines.

Consequently, in this era of fragile sensitivities of often uniformed and disinformed opinions -- where healthy discourse representing various differing points of views is frequently difficult -- if sometimes not impossible to suggest, one is often hesitate to say anything that can regretfully be misconstrued as bias favoring of one positioning over another without acceptance to contrary reasoning.

Yet, both spheres of these specific activities can and does effect us all in one way or another.   And when either is wrongfully manipulated or falsely perceived as benefiting the selfish advantage of others, there seems little recourse but to summon up the moral courage to speak out and respond accordingly.

Arouse suspicions about anyone choosing to be wary of such potential conflicts, and deciding instead to remain quietly on the sidelines.

As Plato once said, silence gives consent.   Or, as expressed by another with a similar thought, all that is required for offensive conduct to prevail -- where moral boundaries are scorned, taunted, and political advantages of control and influence gravitate only to a privileged few, is for a few good others to say and do nothing.

As Plato once said, silence gives consent.

It's never easy to be a martyr of differences where the occasion may require one to stand in matters of conscience for meaningful principles that are worthy of our beliefs and respect. But sometimes one has to stand for something, or sadly, they will fall for anything.

 
 


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